Findex broadens ‘family office’ model

Findex broadens ‘family office’ model

Wealth management firm Findex has launched a new platform designed to replicate 'family office’ advice for mass affluent clients.


Findex’s Family Office will allow individual advisers to gain access to an expanded suite of services such as tax, wealth management, risk consulting, lending and insurance, and prevent their clients having to deal with multiple specialists.

“In the past, only high net-worth individuals and businesses had access to Family Office-style services,” said Findex chief executive Spiro Paule.

Findex says the new platform will make “the same philosophy and capabilities” of traditional family office services available to individuals and family-run businesses, and will remove the “disjointed, expensive advice” typically offered to businesses.

“After building a company with more than 1800 advisers in key financial areas, we can make this advice and service accessible to individuals and businesses of all sizes, giving them the same services and quality advice,” Mr Paule said.

The new Family Office platform utilises data from 140 financial services programs used across different parts of the business to provide a “one-stop shop” for family-run businesses to manage their financial situation, Findex said.

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Findex broadens ‘family office’ model
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